Wednesday, April 11, 2012

NaBloPoMo April Poetry Catch-Up


Thursday, April 5, 2012
What poem brings comfort at a funeral?


NaBloPoMo April 2012...I honestly had no way of answering this prompt. I have a very strong aversion to funerals, and do not generally read memorial-type poetry.

Friday, April 6, 2012
Share your favourite poem.


Is it actually possible to have one, and only one favorite poem? Some poems stick in my head, others don’t. For instance, I had a few really short poems from The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling half memorized, so you get Kipling.

The Hunting Song of the Seeonee Wolf Pack
As the dawn was breaking the Sambhur belled
Once, twice, and again!
And a doe leaped up -- and a doe leaped up
From the pond in the wood where the wild deer sup.
This I, scouting alone, beheld,
Once, twice, and again!
As the dawn was breaking the Sambhur belled
Once, twice, and again!
And a wolf stole back -- and a wolf stole back
To carry the word to the waiting Pack;
And we sought and we found and we bayed on his track
Once, twice, and again!


As the dawn was breaking the Wolf-pack yelled
Once, twice, and again!
Feet in the jungle that leave no mark!
Eyes that can see in the dark -- the dark!
Tongue -- give tongue to it! Hark! O Hark!
Once, twice, and again!
Monday, April 9, 2012
What is the oldest poem you know?


...This is not a question I can answer. Do Child Ballads count? (I do not know why they call them Child Ballads because many of them are incredibly gruesome. Also, they probably don’t.) Psalms? The Illiad, which I haven’t actually read yet?  
Tuesday, April 10, 2012
Find a poem that was written this year and talk about it in a post.


Going Home by Leonard Cohen
This is one of those introspective poems that make folks who don’t like poetry say that poetry is all very subjective and personal. (Which no, they really aren’t.) Here’s the poem set to music. Now that I hear it, I think it would probably fit the prompt requirements for Thursday April 5th.
Wednesday, April 11, 2012
Look up the personal life of your favourite poet -- any surprises?

Emily Dickinson: Not many surprises, but mostly because I knew at least some of the things mentioned in this article already. For instance, I knew that Dickinson’s work was often edited by publishers, and I knew that she had several long distance relationships. The article also mentions that there was some kind of feud concerning the publishing of some of the poems, which I had not known previously.